School classes--"hour" or "period"?

The school I went to in Texas referred to each class of the day as a period, as in What class do you have for third period?

The school the Bratlings go to in Missouri refers to them as hours, as in Hey, wanna skip third hour?

What are they called where you went to school? Bonus points for a rough idea of where that was.

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Went to school in Oregon and we called them periods. Never heard them called hours. Are those blocks of classes actually an hour long?

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Not exactly, no. For a while, there were seven “hours” in middle school and six in high school. Then they changed to block-scheduling in high school, so there were only three or four “hours.”

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Interesting. In middle school we had A/B days with four or five class periods a day (long time ago, hard to remember the specifics). In high school it changed from a four term school year to a trimester one. Same classes every day for a third of the year, then a different set.

The weird part were that most classes required two different trimesters, so if you got stuck with a class that took place in the first trimester and the last one you had the middle of the year to forget about the subject.

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Michigan, 2007 to 2010, it was “hours” and they were around 50 minutes long IIRC.

A school with block schedules (i.e. classes over an hour) might be more inclined to call them periods.

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Pretty sure we had periods in central Wisconsin, but that was back in the late 80s early 90s, so not sure how helpful it will be (I had “junior high” not “middle school” – and actually, I think it is STILL junior high there). And we had the A/B thing that @AAMacConnell mentioned. I don’t think we had A/B in actual high school though. There were some semester-only classes, though.

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They were called “periods” in the '70s in Boise, ID.
My granddaughter’s high school here in Spokane, WA also refers to them as periods.

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Growing up, we just had junior high, too, but here they had both middle school and junior high until just a few years ago. I think it’s all just junior high now.

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It depends on how the day is structured. My school had alternating days with some classes on Red days and some on Black days (Red and Black were the school colors).

Red Black
First Second 1.5 hours
Third Third 1 hour “Homeroom”
Fourth Fifth 1.5 hours & 30min Lunch
Sixth Seventh 1.5 hours

So with this you can’t call them “hours” since they aren’t hour long. And yes, this meant you might have a completely different lunchtime on different days. And these times are ‘in theory’. Last period was shortest (not counting 3rd) and 4th/5th were always longest (because they had to accommodate lunches).

3rd was effectively homeroom, but grade based homeroom was English class, because everyone had to take it every year. So something effecting the entire school was done in 3rd period (lock down drill) but something for a grade level was done in English (graduation information. Prom information, etc)

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It just reminds me the year I moved away from my childhood home the population had grown so much that we had four different “classes”. Red, blue, green and yellow. Because there wasn’t enough space in the huge elementary school for all of the children. So it turned into a year round school where only three of the colours were in session at a time.

The stupidest part of it all was that all of the documents were done in the colour of the group. So people in Yellow had to read yellow text on white. Just the stupidest thing.

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They were periods in middle school, where we had seven periods (or classes) a day. Five of them were year-long courses (the academic courses), and the other two were “exploratories” which rotated six times a year. These were classes like home ec, keyboarding, art, gym, etc.

We called them blocks in high school since we had four 90-ish minute classes from August through December. Then we had four different 90-ish minute classes from January through May. So it’s a little like the red/black day or A/B day that I heard from a lot of the students I tutored (or when I taught), except every day was an A/red day in the fall and every day was a B/black day in the winter/spring.

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We called them “periods” in Ontario (Ottawa)… in the middle of provincial curriculum changes. :stuck_out_tongue:

Two semesters, TAP (‘teacher advisor program’, homeroom) and four periods. For my grade 9 year we had the same schedule each day. Odd and interesting, teachers had to teach 6 1/2 classes that year.
For grades 10-12, we had Day 1 (MWF) and Day 2 (TTh).
My grade 12 year, we went straight to class rather than TAP {goal setting and report card times}. (2000-2004)

I don’t remember calling them anything but what subject we had in grade 7 and 8 though… (intermediate grades rather than middle school; was a JK-8 school). We had a 6 day cycle with TAG (‘teacher advisor group’, homeroom) and 8 ‘periods’.
Music, Science, Health & PE, and Design + Tech had 2 time slots at a time. (1998-2000)

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Currently in high school. We call them periods; I’ve been to different events to meet highschoolers from all over the U.S., and everyone seemed to use “periods” and not “hours”. I’m from WA, if that helps. :slight_smile:

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Southern California, never heard of hours. We called them periods. I think 6-7 in a day. They were usually about 50 minutes long, iirc, with 10 minutes passing period between them. We also didn’t have homeroom at any of my schools, so I don’t know what exactly homeroom is, to be honest. lol

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It’s supposed to be a place for announcements and attendance, so usually your first period, but I think in some cases it wasn’t even a period, it was just a room to make sure everyone was actually there, then they were dismissed to actual classes. That’s why there’s the ‘we had the same homeroom’ ‘Oh really?’ because they weren’t there long enough to know someone in that ‘class’

It seems to have been phased out since there are easier ways of passing out announcements and attendance is taken for all classes anyway.

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Toronto (Ontario, Canada) in the 1980s and 1990s they were “periods”. My school had a five-day week (with one Monday schedule taking place instead of a Tuesday sometime throughout the year because of holidays); my siblings’ schools had the A/B format.

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Yep, this is how people would probably talk about me and homeroom in eighth grade. I never heard about any announcements because I had to go all the way across the school before morning announcements to make it to my gifted Algebra I class on time.

I never had that homeroom teacher for a class later in the day, so she couldn’t just tell me what I missed then. But that’s another story.

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My county had… I don’t remember the name for it, but they had super special classes that were only taught at certain schools. If you were at that school you just went to class, if you weren’t you had to drive to the other school. I never understood how the classes could really be that much more special. There was a girl in my English class that was usually late returning to our school after. I think after awhile our teacher just expected her not to come in after (she was straight A - most students in that program were).

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At the high schools I went to (in New South Wales, Australia), they were periods. One school had a separate homeroom (called ‘devotions’ due to it being an ultra-religious school), the other school just took roll at the beginning of each class period.

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Public high school in New Hampshire - we called them “blocks” - A Block, B Block, etc - from A-H. Monday was A-H blocks (about 45 min per class). Tuesday/Thursday were “A Days” (A, C, E, G blocks, ~90 min per class) and Wednesday/Friday were “B Days” (B, D, F, H blocks).

I’ve since learned that not a lot of other schools (even in our local area) do it that way.

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