Author Website

I want to create an author website. Not sure if it’s worth the effort and money, though, especially since I have no published work so far. Would be nice to have an online presence when I do want to sell some stories.

Should I focus solely on having social media accounts (I have a Facebook page that I’m considering revamping), or put my energy into both a website and social media?

For those with websites, what platforms do you use to create yours? There’s a lot of options out there, so it’d be nice to narrow them down to a few. I’m not a complete computer dunce (I majored in multimedia design, which included coding websites and wordpress, etc.), but the less time I have to spend on building a website, the more time I have to devote to writing. and I’m lazy

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I use Wix for my author website. I made mine very simple because all it is is an information holder, basically. It’s just something I can direct people to if they need information on me. I wouldn’t put much effort into a site until you need to. As for social media, I find it helpful to focus on just one. I’ve just started a twitter, so that’s what I’m focused on right now.

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It’s worth it as a central hub for self-promotion and social media presence. And these days, template sites are pretty easy to come by, so you can have a working website that’ll do what you need it to in like, an hour or less. So you know.

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In terms of which platform to use, it really depends on which building experience you want to have. Wix.com is pure drag and drop, which can become a hassle quite quickly I’ve found.

Weebly.com is also drag and drop, but less finicky.

Wordpress.com (not .org) is basic and can work. And you can easily connect your feed for people to subscribe to via the Wordpress platform.

Squarespace.com (which you’ve probably heard of if you listen to any podcast) is very much template based, so less hassle. Just pick the sections you want on your page and voilà!

If you want something basic without hassle, I’d lean towards the last two, but it really depends how you’re going to use the website and what’s going to go in it.

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I actually found out last night that I had an old Weebly account for some online game I used to play, and discovered I’d started building a writing website on it ages ago. Played around with it again and it’s so easy to use, and everything looks good so far. Looking forward to seeing their paid content, because it looks like their shop option is really easy to set up for when I decide I’m ready to sell some stories.

So, going to throw up a recommendation for Weebly (didn’t like Wix for some reason) for anyone looking to start a simple and easy website.

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@yuuen if you are inclined to start over new, I would suggest Wordpress (the free .com one). There are plenty of themes to choose from that are free at the website and tons of free ones online. Customizing and adding widgets to your sidebar is easy, esp adding social media links. Anything you don’t understand how to do is just a Google search away - there are lots of people who blog about how to do Wordpress. But the best thing about it (other than no limit on content and it’s FREE) is if you do decide to go for a paid website at some future point, where you can have your own chosen domain name and more freedom, is that all the hosted packages always have an easy way to transfer your Wordpress.com site. Just a thought.

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It’s important to have an online presence so that when you start making a name for yourself there’s something to look up.

I would suggest, if you’re serious about your writing (or about whatever industry you’re in), to get a paid service. Most of them are fairly cheap month to month at least in the beginning when you are basically hosting a handful of static pages. The reason for this is free versions look free and lack a level of professionalism.

When you get ‘big’ (or moderate sized) you’ll want to change to a better service with more features and moving a website is always annoying. Even porting a free version to the paid version is not without hiccups, and might require rebuilding a lot of the site design.

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I use carrd.co for a greeting card site, although mine’s use is more to twitter friends than anything else, but I’m sure you could make it into a little website.

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